Archive for the ‘Legacy of Friends’ Stories’ Category

“Deadly Poison (Ivy) Will Not Hurt Them At All”

June 30, 2018

(Bill Campbell, whose story this is, is 79. He has been my pastor for the past 21 years. The Holy Spirit has prompted him to write a book titled THE GOD OF PROMISES, which he is in the process of submitting for publication. This testimony of his healing from poison ivy is excerpted from the latest revision with his permission. If you’re interested in reading the entire book, let me know below.)

When we pray, the Spirit will illuminate any Scripture he desires in answer to our prayer. And, we believe that he will help us when we believe his words. For example: recently I was spraying weed killer on some poison ivy growing down the hillside behind our home. I saw some growing behind a large maple tree, and I had to stoop down and spray under the tree to reach it. A branch of the tree was in my way and I pushed it out of the way with my shoulder to spray back under the tree. While I was spraying the branch popped loose and was rubbing against the side of my face. When I looked at it I realized that the poison ivy had grown up the tree and out onto that branch and it was the poison ivy I was pushing out of my way with my arm, shoulder and the side of my face.

I have been very sensitive to poison ivy in the past and get seriously bad rashes and blisters. Not long after getting back to the house and washing up, the left side of my face and my left shoulder were already starting to get red and puffy.

I was praying, and I reminded the Lord: “You said that ‘by your wounds I am healed.’ This isn’t right – as your child I should be healed.” Then I heard in my mind, … when they drink deadly poison, it will not hurt them at all. I thought, “Lord, that is out of context.” I immediately heard again, … when they drink deadly poison, it will not hurt them at all. I was thinking this over silently, and I heard in my mind for the third time, … when they drink deadly poison, it will not hurt them at all.

I knew that the Holy Spirit has the right to take Scripture out of context and apply it to our circumstances even though we do not have that right without his specific guidance. So I said, “Lord, that is out of context, but if that is your word for me I receive it gladly, and I thank you.” That evening the rash got no worse, and the next morning the poison ivy rash was gone, healed. The Word of God, inspired by the Holy Spirit, is powerful and active.

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LEGACY OF FRIENDS’S STORIES 1: Matthew’s Miracle

June 16, 2018

On Saturday evening May 26, 2018, our son, Matthew,

and I were praying prior to him saying goodnight. When we concluded, he put his arms around me and said, “My wallet slipped out somewhere. I hope that you can forgive me.” When I asked him when he had last remembered having it, he told me, “at the library book sale”–that was on May 6th! So I assured him that he didn’t need to apologize, that I was sorry that had happened to him, and we would buy him a new wallet. However, as he restlessly paced in his room, I realized that he was agitated and unhappy. I said goodnight to him and told him I would see him in the morning.

After I left his room, I began to pray, “Lord, where is Matthew’s wallet?” I believe that Jesus put the thought in my mind, “Check with the movie theater.” Well, he and his dad had been to a couple of movies in May, but this seemed unlikely. The following afternoon I detoured from our list of errands and stopped at the theatre. Matthew asked why we were there. I told him I wanted to ask if the cleaning people had found his wallet or if someone had turned one in.

I spoke with one of the managers, explained the situation, and was surprised when she admitted that a man’s wallet had been found. I also shared that Matthew had been at the theatre recently, but that he is autistic and doesn’t have a sense of timing. Thus, he may have lost it on May 24th or Friday two weeks prior. The manager began to ask questions to determine if I could identify the wallet, such as the colour, brand name, and contents. I knew there would be no ID card in the wallet, which complicated things. Eventually, after a number of questions, I was able to relay that there should be at least 2-$20 dollar bills in it, and pointed out that if Matthew could see the wallet, he would know whether or not it was his and would not say it was his if it wasn’t.  To reinforce that truth, I recounted that our son had recently found a wallet that was not his and had promptly returned the wallet to its owner.

As I called Matthew over to the office, the manager immediately recognized him and said, “He’s one of our regular customers.” She was holding the wallet in a way that we couldn’t see it and asked the names and times of the movies that Matthew had recently seen. I provided the requested information and she seemed satisfied. When she passed the wallet to Matthew, his whole countenance changed. He had been so upset and out-of-sorts. Instantly, he was smiling broadly as he shook the manager’s hand and thanked her for taking good care of his wallet and keeping it safe for him! The manager apologized that she had to ask so many questions, but she needed to make sure the wallet was going to its rightful owner. I thanked her profusely, pointing out that she had just made Matthew’s day!

Later, at the car, I said to Matthew that I had prayed to God about his lost wallet. I also told him that God put the idea in my mind to check at the movie theater. I said, “Isn’t it great that God helped them find your wallet and keep it safe for you, and did you say thank you to Him?” He agreed, and then he prayed, “God, thank you for keeping my wallet safe and getting it back to me. Amen.”

What a faith builder for both of us! Thank You, Jesus: This is the year of the favour of the Lord…” (Isaiah 61: 1-3)!  Hallelujah!

Elizabeth Hogan Hayduk

Former Salvation Army Officer (pastor)

THE LEGACY OF NOT FITTING THE MOLD: GARY M’S STORY

May 31, 2018

Not everyone fits the mold.

Gary M., my longest-standing friend, is a case in point. Gary is 66 (I’m 65, almost 66). I’m taking him to 2 doctor’s appointments tomorrow, so he’s on my mind.

We met in my 3rd year of college, in January of 1971 on a bus from Atlanta to Charlotte. I was headed back from Atlanta, Gary got on in Greenville SC, and we began to talk. Even though we’d been at college together (the college was another 100 miles past Charlotte), we’d never met there. Small world, but an even smaller bus. I offered Gary a ride from my house near Charlotte (I had a car, he didn’t) and he took me up on it.

A couple weeks later, he introduced me to my first wife Iris (whom I married 2 years after the intro, was married 25 years, and she died at the end of 1998—that’s in some other blogposts I’ve written). We lived in Columbia from 1978 to 1984, and Gary lived with us for a year while going to law school at USC-Columbia SC. He graduated and got his law degree (Gary had a great mind and loved thinking and talking theology, law, ethics—anything in those realms). He ended up not being able to make it as an attorney in spite of his brilliant mind, primarily because he loved the poor and downtrodden. He has ended up working at a number of jobs for non-profits and disabilities board-type institutions, at subsistence wages. He never married (though he had several women who wanted to) and cared for his mom in her feebler later years (she just died about 3 years ago). Ironically, one of the women who really wanted to marry him, had the same last name as his mom, whose name was Evelyn W,, and her name was Ellen W. Go figure.

Gary has a great heart also. He has wanted to foster and often ends up helping down-and-outs who end up being a drain on his patience and resources, and almost never meet Gary’s expectations in the relationship. Thus is life, at least Gary’s life. In the last few years, he’s had not only his mom but a number of other key people in his social network pass away. So he’s struggling. And busy as I am, I’m trying to fit more time and diligence into the relationship, just because.

I treasure Gary and his insights (even when I disagree). He is one of those people it’s hard not to like, even love. But it does take a lot of patience. Still overall, it’s worth it. You only get a few friends like that in a lifetime. He’s part of my legacy, and I want to honor him with that thought here.

THE LEGACY OF FRIENDS’ STORIES (Introduction)

May 30, 2018

Maybe it was because Monday (5/29/18) was Memorial Day. Maybe it was just because I was trying to figure out where to go after exhausting the 16 LEGACY blogposts I wrote 3-4 years ago and had made the commitment to try to post every day if possible. And maybe it was just because it was time.

In LEGACY 15 I had mentioned a story Geneva Anderson had told in her speeches as a coach and in Toastmasters competitions, called “Light the Pink Candle.” Then I read a story (on Facebook)of another friend about a miracle of faith in the life of her 21-year-old autistic son. So I emailed Geneva’s son (Geneva passed away last December) and messaged the friend on FB asking permission to share their stories on my blog. Both agreed. So when I get copies I’ll be posting them.

This is the introductory post for a folder I’ll call FRIENDS’ STORIES. With art, the sum of the works of all the great writers/musicians/artists in a generation is greater than an individual (think Elizabethan literature & Shakespeare/Romantic-era music & Beethoven/Impressionism & Monet or Manet). So the sphere of my legacy includes inspiring stories I’ve heard from and through friends and family, or even other sources as I go along.

This could well be a never-ending legacy.